500+ Teachers Told Us About Their Favorite Classroom Technology

Ever wonder what educators consider their favorite classroom technology? We did too, so we asked the experts themselves! In our We Are Teachers survey, more than 500 educators shared everything from the high-tech gadgets to the tried-and-true classics that help make the magic happen every day. Let’s dive into the results—you’ll see that one platform in particular took home the gold!

First, let’s look at how often teachers and students are actively using classroom technology.

We Are Teachers June 2024 Survey

Clearly, most teachers fall somewhere in the middle—they’re using technology for some or most parts of instruction, but not all of it.

Teachers also told us that they’re using a variety of classroom technology. Seventy percent responded that their students have 1:1 devices, and 23% said they have a classroom set of laptops. Overwhelmingly, teachers use these devices for student assessment (77%), student engagement (43%), student presentations (82%), and tools for teacher productivity (74%). Only 11% of teachers said they allow students to use ChatGPT, AI, or cell phones during instruction.

Now, let’s look at how teachers get new technology. 

Most teachers said the two biggest roadblocks to using more technology were the price and the lack of professional development.

Teachers also mentioned other factors that keep them from using more technology. Fourteen percent of teachers said the lengthy district approval process was a roadblock, 9% of teachers said they lacked the actual technology (e.g., laptops), and 8% of teachers said the lack of tech support and access to specialists were their biggest hurdles.

When they are able to choose technology, most teachers said the most important factor in selecting classroom technology is that it shouldn’t create extra work for them. 

And why would they want extra work? Teachers are stretched thin enough as it is. Survey respondent and teacher Natalie M. put it this way: “Technology needs to streamline tasks for teachers, not create more.”

Hovering at around the same percentage (between 15% and 19%) were price, versatility, and accessibility features. Teachers are looking for technology that’s free, a one-stop shop, and tech that works for all students.

Now, let’s take a look at what teachers said are their favorites.

Teachers’ favorite technology for student engagement is Kahoot, followed by GoNoodle and Nearpod. 

Teachers’ favorite technology for student engagement is Kahoot, followed by GoNoodle and Nearpod. 
We Are Teachers June 2024 Survey

Teachers’ favorite technology tool for student assessment is Google Forms, followed by Kahoot and Edpuzzle.

Teachers’ favorite technology tool for student assessment is Google Forms, followed by Kahoot and Edpuzzle.
We Are Teachers June 2024 Survey

Hands-down, teachers’ favorite tool for student presentations is Google Slides.

Hands-down, teachers’ favorite tool for student presentations is Google Slides.
We Are Teachers June 2024 Survey

Google Classroom and Google Calendar are overwhelmingly teachers’ favorite technology tools for teacher productivity.

Google Classroom and Google Calendar are overwhelmingly teachers' favorite technology tools for teacher productivity.
We Are Teachers June 2024 Survey

Finally, teachers’ favorite learning management system is Google Classroom, followed by Canvas. 

Finally, teachers’ favorite learning management system is Google Classroom, followed by Canvas. 
We Are Teachers June 2024 Survey

Teachers also wrote in with their other favorites: Blooket, Canva, and Quizizz.

When it comes to classroom technology, what do teachers wish they had more of?

We asked teachers what one thing they would change about the way technology is used/acquired. Here’s what they had to say.  

More PD/training

“I think teachers need to pilot classroom technology, not just be given it and expect us to like it and figure out how to use it. Better trainings would also be helpful.” —Ellen Hester, Teacher

“I wish we had more professional development time to explore and implement. It’s hard to see exactly how it works when you only see the teacher side of things.” —Shelley Sims, Teacher

More voice and choice

“Teachers would be given their own technology budget and then be able to purchase the platforms that best suit their needs.” —M.V.M., Teacher

We Are Teachers survey respondent K. Weaver

Better awareness of what’s out there

“Don’t keep ALL the good stuff behind the premium wall. Give us a little more on the free version to get us hooked and wanting to advocate for our building/district to purchase the premium features for us.” —Molly Ketchell, Teacher

Overall funding 

“We can’t do anything without money. Not just for the devices, but the upkeep. Not just for the premium subscriptions, but for the premium subscriptions year after year.” —L. Ross, 9th grade teacher

What do teachers worry about when it comes to classroom technology? 

Technology replacing fundamental skills 

“I am concerned that with the increase in the use of technology in classrooms, especially in lower elementary grades, students will struggle more with spelling, grammar, and sentence structure. All of the ‘smart’ devices we have automatically correct these things for students, which doesn’t help them learn the skills.” —Breanna Underwood, Teacher

Keeping up with it

We Are Teachers survey respondent S. Leedy

The Wild West of AI

“I am concerned that some teachers will try to completely ban anything that is AI because they think it is doing too much for kids. The teachers need to embrace it, learn about it, and figure out how it can enhance their teaching and student learning.” —Melissa Jaeger, Teacher

“I am concerned that there aren’t any guidelines/laws about AI use in the classroom both for teachers and students, yet we are already using it.” —J.N., Literacy Specialist

Privacy

“Student privacy. We’ve had to stop using some tools because companies are unwilling to sign a document (mandated by our state, NY) that states that student data will be protected. I don’t want to be the reason a student’s data makes it onto the Dark Web.” —J.H., Teacher

Clearly, our survey offers several takeaways about the current state of classroom technology. Teachers and schools need better funding and more voice in the allocation of that funding. They need quality professional development when new technology is rolled out from someone who knows the technology inside and out. Most importantly, teachers need for classroom technology to make their jobs easier, not harder. One company in particular seems to be getting that right: Google.

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